Discussion:
The Upcoming Deluxe DVD
(too old to reply)
axis in ladyland
2005-06-18 18:00:01 UTC
Permalink
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/upcoming_releases/jimi_hendrix_deluxe_edition_dvd.html?200506170312

Jimi Hendrix Deluxe Edition DVD

Date: 2005-06-17 Artist: Hendrix Jimi Category: Upcoming Releases

On September 18, 1970, the world lost one of the greatest rock
guitarists ever with the passing of Jimi Hendrix. Three years after his
death, the biographical rockumentary Jimi Hendrix provided fans with
rare on-stage footage as well as behind-the-scenes access to the guitar
wizard. Now, 35 years after his untimely death, Warner Home Video (WHV)
will release the long-awaited Jimi Hendrix Deluxe Edition DVD available
on June 28th, 2005.

This definitive documentary was the first authorized effort to detail
Hendrix's celebrated life and career. Loaded with bonus features, this
release contains 75 minutes of additional footage from the vaults,
including a never-before-seen performance of "Stone Free" by Hendrix,
and The Making Of Dolly Dagger with original Hendrix engineer Eddie
Kramer breaking down the mix and exclusive interviews with prominent
musicians who were friends of Hendrix's such as Pete Townshend, Mick
Jagger, Eric Clapton, Little Richard, Lou Reed, Buddy Miles and others
who reminisce about Hendrix's fascinating life and his influence on
rock music.

Remastered and remixed by engineer Eddie Kramer for exceptional picture
quality and sound, Jimi Hendrix Deluxe Edition is the ultimate rock
experience. Savor 13 songs along with full-length concert performances
and legendary footage from his Monterey, Woodstock and Isle of Wright
performances.

Hendrix classics like "Hey Joe," "Rock Me Baby," "Like A Rolling
Stone," "The Star-Spangled Banner," "Wild Thing," "Purple Haze,"
"Machine Gun," "Johnny B. Goode," "Like A Rolling Stone," "Hear My
Train a' Comin," "Red House" and "In From The Storm," come alive in 5.1
Dolby Digital Surround.

Born in Seattle in 1942, Hendrix remains one of the most influential
figures in rock history. In his brief four-year stint as an
international music superstar, Hendrix was an innovator in the truest
sense of the word. A self-taught left-handed wizard, Hendrix possessed
the ability to turn the feedback and distortion he produced into a
fresh new sound that has yet to be duplicated. His crowd-pleasing
showmanship - whether playing his guitar behind his back, with his
teeth or setting it on fire - transformed Hendrix from mere mortal to a
legendary rock icon.
From the Ukulele to the Strat (Runtime 63:00 min)
Remembering Hendrix through interviews with family and friends
Including Father Al Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Drummer Mitch Mitchell,
Billy Cox, Girlfriend Fayne Pridgeon, Buddy Miles, Linda Keith (she
discovered Jimi in NY), Pete Townshend, Jimi's Producer/Engineer Eddie
Kramer, Harold "H" Parker, Jimi's Road Manager Eric Barrett and Touring
Manager Gerry Stickells.

"Stone Free" Uncut (Runtime 6:10 min)

Never-before-seen performance at the Atlanta Pop Festival, summer of
1970.

The Making of "Dolly Dagger" (Runtime 6:05 min)

Producer/Engineer Eddie Kramer breaks down the mix.
axis in ladyland
2005-06-19 21:57:18 UTC
Permalink
And fwiw,
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0009E3234/qid=1119218158/sr=1-2/ref=sr_1_2/103-5533473-9866255?v=glance&s=dvd
axis in ladyland
2005-06-28 18:37:49 UTC
Permalink
Reminder: It's out now. I'm on my way downtown to pick mine up.
Comments, for what they might be worth, ASAP.

http://www.therockradio.com/2005/06/hendrix-dvd-out-today.html

Tuesday, June 28, 2005

Hendrix DVD out today

The Jimi Hendrix documentary A Film About Jimi Hendrix comes out today
(Tuesday, June 28, 2005) on DVD. The double-disc package features a
remastered version of the 1973 movie, with audio that's been remixed in
5.1 Surround Sound, and over 75 minutes' worth of never-before-seen
bonus material.

A Film About Jimi Hendrix includes several interviews with the
guitarist, as well as performance footage from Woodstock, the Monterey
Pop Festival, the Atlanta Pop Festival, and the Isle Of Wight Festival
in the UK. It also has interviews with Hendrix, Who leader Pete
Townshend, Eric Clapton, Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger, and Lou
Reed, among others.

The bonus features include the movie From The Ukulele To The Strat,
with interviews from Hendrix bandmates Mitch Mitchell, Billy Cox, and
Buddy Miles; the full, six-minute version of "Stone Free" Hendrix did
at the Atlanta Pop Festival on July 4, 1970, which has never been
released before; and a featurette from 1972 with producer and engineer
Eddie Kramer at the Hendrix-owned Electric Lady Studios in New York
City, where he shows how the song "Dolly Dagger" was mixed,
section-by-section.
p***@comcast.net
2005-07-20 14:50:02 UTC
Permalink
I recently purchased the new Deluxe DVD. The sound quality is
incredible. I do have a question (complaint?) about the video. In
many of the scenes there appears to be a small white spot, almost
directly in the middle of the sceen. It is very apparent in many of
the interviews. I returned my first copy to the store and excahned it
but the same spot is visible in my new copy. It really appears to be a
spot from the original movie master that was used in the conversion to
the DVD, Has anyone else noticed this and is this something from the
original master or was this a bad analog-to-digital transfer by Warner?
Is this on all copies or did I just get mine from a bad batch?

Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Paul
p***@comcast.net
2005-07-21 03:30:19 UTC
Permalink
OH, and did I miss somthing else. My copy is not a double-dvd but IS
the latest release. The one I have is

http://tinyurl.com/93h5q

Thanks
Paul
Mix
2005-07-21 08:10:13 UTC
Permalink
I thought from the pre-press that it was a double-DVD myself, but it isn't.
As for the ubiquitous white dot, it's direct from the original print, just
like the film scratches on "Watchtower" on _BWA_. They'd have fixed it if
they could have. They worked with what they had. Any comments on the
additional footage?
Post by p***@comcast.net
OH, and did I miss somthing else. My copy is not a double-dvd but IS
the latest release. The one I have is
http://tinyurl.com/93h5q
Thanks
Paul
pcmancini
2005-07-21 13:14:24 UTC
Permalink
I've watched it twice and since it has been quite some time since I saw
the original in the theater I was really watching for enjoyment and not
with a critical eye. The only extra I viewed so far is "Stone Free"
As I said, the sound, through a 5.1 system with the subwoofer cranked,
is incredible. ( I think any additional Hendrix concert footage is
worth the price of admission but I did not watch this with a critical
eye either.)

I only hope that they release a CD with the complete songs. The
original soundtrack LP is great but I do not have a turntable anymore -
and if they remaster, even better because the sound on the LP was just
OK, not great. The LP also had a number of interviews not contained in
the movies so I guess this may overlap with the additional interviews
on the deluxe DVD.

Thanks for the info.
Paul
axis in ladyland
2005-07-23 17:34:13 UTC
Permalink
http://www.dvdtimes.co.uk/content.php?contentid=57877

Jimi Hendrix: Deluxe Edition | 23-07-2005 00:00

The Sixties produced a plethora of fine guitarists, and a good few
great ones, but all would defer to one man. John Allen Hendrix, later
renamed James Marshall Hendrix (1942-1970), burned very brightly
indeed, but not for long. He numbers amongst the most significant
musicians of the last century, expanding the possibilities of his
instrument like no other. That instrument was, of course, the electric
guitar. In his hands, he showed definitively that it was a different
beast to its acoustic cousin. There's no doubt he could play acoustic
if he wanted to - in fact, the cover image of this DVD shows him
hunched over a acoustic twelve-string - but apart from his technique
and prowess, it was his mastery of sustain, feedback and sheer volume
that set him apart. He was a man who united contradictions: a black man
playing in a musical genre (amplified hard rock) mostly dominated by
whites. Quite shy offstage, he was an unashamed cock-rocker onstage.
His impact derived in part from his charisma, overt sexuality and
showmanship, in addition to his mastery of the amplified six strings.

And there is of course, his early death. That certainly doesn't
always ensure icon status: notice how, ten years on, River Phoenix is
slipping away from the public consciousness while Kurt Cobain remains
there. It's fascinating to speculate what Hendrix would have done if
he hadn't died (by all accounts, accidentally). He seemed to be
moving away from the blues-based rock power trio epitomised by the
Experience, to explore jazz. But who can tell? Certainly the studio
albums he made still repay listening now, and his concert appearances
- especially at Monterey and Woodstock - retain their potency to
this day.

Jimi Hendrix was released in 1973. It has no director's credit:
it's "assembled by" Joe Boyd, produced by John Head and
researched by Gary Weis. It interviews family (especially Hendrix's
father Al), friends and colleagues and fellow musicians: a reasonably
comprehensive list given some notable omissions, more of which later.
Interspersed with the interviews are live performances: from the
literally pyrotechnic finale of "Wild Thing" at the Monterey Pop,
the performance of "Star Spangled Banner" at Woodstock, to the Isle
of Wight Festival, the Marquee Club and the Fillmore East. We hear from
army buddies like Billy Cox (who later played bass for Hendrix in the
Band of Gypsies), former bosses like Little Richard (who is on
flamboyant form here). Germaine Greer turns up to discuss how Hendrix
found the adulation hard to cope with. Meanwhile, contemporaries such
as Mick Jagger, Eric Clapton and especially Pete Townshend chip in on
Hendrix's musical impact.

The film arranges the interviews in more-or-less chronological order,
and are well edited so that the hour-and-three-quarter running time
doesn't drag. As I said above, there are some omissions. It would be
good to hear from Bob Dylan, who both influenced Hendrix and was
influenced by him: Hendrix's version of Dylan's "All Along the
Watchtower" is surely definitive, something acknowledged by Dylan,
who played the song Hendrix-style on his Rolling Thunder tour, as heard
on the live album Before the Flood. However, given Dylan's
characteristic contrariness, maybe that didn't work out. Also on my
wish-list would be Steve Winwood and Jefferson Airplane's Jack
Casady, who joined Hendrix and the Experience's faithful drummer
Mitch Mitchell on the long version of "Voodoo Chile" on Electric
Ladyland, though perhaps that would best be placed in a more in-depth
study of that album.

An omission closer to home is Noel Redding, bassist in the Experience.
Mitch Mitchell is present and happy to talk, but Redding is completely
absent. There's no doubt there was some bitterness there. Redding was
a guitarist who turned up to audition for the Animals, to be offered
the bass gig in the Experience by Hendrix's manager (and Animals
bassist) Chas Chandler. Apparently Hendrix liked his Afro hairstyle.
However, in the latter days of the Experience, Redding found himself
increasingly marginalised. There's a story of his turning up to work
one day during the sessions for Electric Ladyland to be asked "Who
the fuck are you?" by one of the many hangers-on. (His answer:
"I'm only the fucking bass player.") On that album, there are
tracks where there is no bass at all, or an outside bassist is brought
in (Jack Casady, as mentioned above), or the instrument is played by
Hendrix himself. Apparently as a sop to Redding, Hendrix gave him a
song credit and lead vocal: that song, "Little Miss Strange" is by
no means bad, but it's patently dwarfed by the company it keeps. You
have to feel sorry for Redding, who faced the dilemma that Peter
Shaffer dramatised in Amadeus: that of someone who is not untalented
confronted by genius. A by all accounts bitter man, Redding (who died
in 2003) does not participate in this documentary.

Jimi Hendrix remains a model of the biographical documentary, and
remains a good place for beginners who may wish to explore further the
man's legacy on DVD and CD. The interviews put it all in context,
while the live footage shows us precisely what it was all about.

The DVD

Jimi Hendrix was previously released as a bare-bones Warner's back
catalogue disc with mono sound. It's now been revisited in this
Deluxe Edition. I'm reviewing the American release, which is NTSC
format and encoded for Regions 1, 2, 3 and 4. There are twenty-four
chapter stops. Subtitles are provided for the feature only.

The DVD is anamorphic, in a ratio of 1.78:1. Is this the correct ratio?
Yes and no. The film shows every sign of being shot in 16mm (grain,
softness and all) and some of the concert footage (Monterey, Woodstock)
certainly was. Some shots do look cropped. However, this was a
documentary that was blown up to 35mm and intended for wide
distribution, and then as now, few cinemas could show 4:3 material
properly. The film looks like it's been carefully cropped so that the
vital part of each shot can still be seen if shown in 1.85:1, so that
would be intended ratio, opened up slightly for this DVD. Although the
film has been remastered for this release, it's far from reference
material, given the limitations of its source material, but I doubt
it's looked better.

1973 was before the arrival of Dolby Stereo in cinemas. Some films were
graced with four-track magnetic tracks, but cinemas capable of playing
these were few, mostly big-city showcase venues. In any case, that was
an option that appears not to have been taken up in this film's case,
and it's certainly true that most people at the time of its release
would have heard it in mono, as was the original DVD release. This
edition however has two soundtrack options, Dolby Digital 5.1 and
surround-encoded Dolby Digital 2.0. Normally, I'd be against remixing
a mono track, but this is an exception. Most of the film remains
monophonic, with surround sound only coming in with the live material.
This footage was professionally recorded with multitrack recording
equipment and in the case of Monterey Pop and Woodstock 5.1 soundtracks
already exist. Be warned: this footage is considerably louder than the
interview footage, but if your neighbours don't object it sounds
great. Surrounds are used for audience applause. Thanks to the
subwoofer, any bassists who want to play along with Redding or Cox will
be well served.

There exists an outstanding commentary on the life, times and music of
Hendrix, but that was provided by Charles Shaar Murray (author of the
Hendrix book Crosstown Traffic) for Criterion's release of Jimi Plays
Monterey in their Complete Monterey Pop box set. There's no
commentary on Jimi Hendrix. I doubt one could compete, but as the film
is a biographical documentary, it would be mostly superfluous anyway.
The extras that are provided are certainly worthwhile.

"From the Ukulele to the Strat" is a long featurette that seems to
have been made at the same time as the feature, given the age and
appearance of the participants. It consists of interviews with many of
the same people interviewed in Jimi Hendrix, but with no live footage.
It complements the main feature quite nicely, and some good anecdotes
are forthcoming. It's presented in 4:3 and runs 63:01.

"The Making of Dolly Dagger" (6:31) uses the format familiar to
many "Classic Album" editions. Here engineer Eddie Kramer sits at a
mixing desk and takes us through this song from Rainbow Bridge,
breaking it down into its component parts: the basic
guitar/bass/drums/vocals, plus layers of guitar, fuzz bass, congas,
footstamps and backing vocals. Finally, "Stone Free Uncut" (6:06)
is a previously-unreleased performance from the 1970 Atlanta Pop
Festival. This is in 4:3 and has only 2.0 mono sound, but Hendrix fans
will certainly be glad to have it.

With Jimi Hendrix, Warners have revisited a film that was a
midnight-movie favourite in the 1970s and updated the DVD release with
some very worthwhile extras. Fans of the electric guitar, Sixties music
and Hendrix in particular should snap this up.
gipsy boy
2005-07-24 03:43:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by axis in ladyland
http://www.dvdtimes.co.uk/content.php?contentid=57877
Wow, this is an amazing review, in my opinion.. Thanks for letting us know.
--
gipsy boy
Post by axis in ladyland
Jimi Hendrix: Deluxe Edition | 23-07-2005 00:00
The Sixties produced a plethora of fine guitarists, and a good few
great ones, but all would defer to one man. John Allen Hendrix, later
renamed James Marshall Hendrix (1942-1970), burned very brightly
indeed, but not for long. He numbers amongst the most significant
musicians of the last century, expanding the possibilities of his
instrument like no other. That instrument was, of course, the electric
guitar. In his hands, he showed definitively that it was a different
beast to its acoustic cousin. There's no doubt he could play acoustic
if he wanted to - in fact, the cover image of this DVD shows him
hunched over a acoustic twelve-string - but apart from his technique
and prowess, it was his mastery of sustain, feedback and sheer volume
that set him apart. He was a man who united contradictions: a black man
playing in a musical genre (amplified hard rock) mostly dominated by
whites. Quite shy offstage, he was an unashamed cock-rocker onstage.
His impact derived in part from his charisma, overt sexuality and
showmanship, in addition to his mastery of the amplified six strings.
And there is of course, his early death. That certainly doesn't
always ensure icon status: notice how, ten years on, River Phoenix is
slipping away from the public consciousness while Kurt Cobain remains
there. It's fascinating to speculate what Hendrix would have done if
he hadn't died (by all accounts, accidentally). He seemed to be
moving away from the blues-based rock power trio epitomised by the
Experience, to explore jazz. But who can tell? Certainly the studio
albums he made still repay listening now, and his concert appearances
- especially at Monterey and Woodstock - retain their potency to
this day.
it's "assembled by" Joe Boyd, produced by John Head and
researched by Gary Weis. It interviews family (especially Hendrix's
father Al), friends and colleagues and fellow musicians: a reasonably
comprehensive list given some notable omissions, more of which later.
Interspersed with the interviews are live performances: from the
literally pyrotechnic finale of "Wild Thing" at the Monterey Pop,
the performance of "Star Spangled Banner" at Woodstock, to the Isle
of Wight Festival, the Marquee Club and the Fillmore East. We hear from
army buddies like Billy Cox (who later played bass for Hendrix in the
Band of Gypsies), former bosses like Little Richard (who is on
flamboyant form here). Germaine Greer turns up to discuss how Hendrix
found the adulation hard to cope with. Meanwhile, contemporaries such
as Mick Jagger, Eric Clapton and especially Pete Townshend chip in on
Hendrix's musical impact.
The film arranges the interviews in more-or-less chronological order,
and are well edited so that the hour-and-three-quarter running time
doesn't drag. As I said above, there are some omissions. It would be
good to hear from Bob Dylan, who both influenced Hendrix and was
influenced by him: Hendrix's version of Dylan's "All Along the
Watchtower" is surely definitive, something acknowledged by Dylan,
who played the song Hendrix-style on his Rolling Thunder tour, as heard
on the live album Before the Flood. However, given Dylan's
characteristic contrariness, maybe that didn't work out. Also on my
wish-list would be Steve Winwood and Jefferson Airplane's Jack
Casady, who joined Hendrix and the Experience's faithful drummer
Mitch Mitchell on the long version of "Voodoo Chile" on Electric
Ladyland, though perhaps that would best be placed in a more in-depth
study of that album.
An omission closer to home is Noel Redding, bassist in the Experience.
Mitch Mitchell is present and happy to talk, but Redding is completely
absent. There's no doubt there was some bitterness there. Redding was
a guitarist who turned up to audition for the Animals, to be offered
the bass gig in the Experience by Hendrix's manager (and Animals
bassist) Chas Chandler. Apparently Hendrix liked his Afro hairstyle.
However, in the latter days of the Experience, Redding found himself
increasingly marginalised. There's a story of his turning up to work
one day during the sessions for Electric Ladyland to be asked "Who
"I'm only the fucking bass player.") On that album, there are
tracks where there is no bass at all, or an outside bassist is brought
in (Jack Casady, as mentioned above), or the instrument is played by
Hendrix himself. Apparently as a sop to Redding, Hendrix gave him a
song credit and lead vocal: that song, "Little Miss Strange" is by
no means bad, but it's patently dwarfed by the company it keeps. You
have to feel sorry for Redding, who faced the dilemma that Peter
Shaffer dramatised in Amadeus: that of someone who is not untalented
confronted by genius. A by all accounts bitter man, Redding (who died
in 2003) does not participate in this documentary.
Jimi Hendrix remains a model of the biographical documentary, and
remains a good place for beginners who may wish to explore further the
man's legacy on DVD and CD. The interviews put it all in context,
while the live footage shows us precisely what it was all about.
The DVD
Jimi Hendrix was previously released as a bare-bones Warner's back
catalogue disc with mono sound. It's now been revisited in this
Deluxe Edition. I'm reviewing the American release, which is NTSC
format and encoded for Regions 1, 2, 3 and 4. There are twenty-four
chapter stops. Subtitles are provided for the feature only.
The DVD is anamorphic, in a ratio of 1.78:1. Is this the correct ratio?
Yes and no. The film shows every sign of being shot in 16mm (grain,
softness and all) and some of the concert footage (Monterey, Woodstock)
certainly was. Some shots do look cropped. However, this was a
documentary that was blown up to 35mm and intended for wide
distribution, and then as now, few cinemas could show 4:3 material
properly. The film looks like it's been carefully cropped so that the
vital part of each shot can still be seen if shown in 1.85:1, so that
would be intended ratio, opened up slightly for this DVD. Although the
film has been remastered for this release, it's far from reference
material, given the limitations of its source material, but I doubt
it's looked better.
1973 was before the arrival of Dolby Stereo in cinemas. Some films were
graced with four-track magnetic tracks, but cinemas capable of playing
these were few, mostly big-city showcase venues. In any case, that was
an option that appears not to have been taken up in this film's case,
and it's certainly true that most people at the time of its release
would have heard it in mono, as was the original DVD release. This
edition however has two soundtrack options, Dolby Digital 5.1 and
surround-encoded Dolby Digital 2.0. Normally, I'd be against remixing
a mono track, but this is an exception. Most of the film remains
monophonic, with surround sound only coming in with the live material.
This footage was professionally recorded with multitrack recording
equipment and in the case of Monterey Pop and Woodstock 5.1 soundtracks
already exist. Be warned: this footage is considerably louder than the
interview footage, but if your neighbours don't object it sounds
great. Surrounds are used for audience applause. Thanks to the
subwoofer, any bassists who want to play along with Redding or Cox will
be well served.
There exists an outstanding commentary on the life, times and music of
Hendrix, but that was provided by Charles Shaar Murray (author of the
Hendrix book Crosstown Traffic) for Criterion's release of Jimi Plays
Monterey in their Complete Monterey Pop box set. There's no
commentary on Jimi Hendrix. I doubt one could compete, but as the film
is a biographical documentary, it would be mostly superfluous anyway.
The extras that are provided are certainly worthwhile.
"From the Ukulele to the Strat" is a long featurette that seems to
have been made at the same time as the feature, given the age and
appearance of the participants. It consists of interviews with many of
the same people interviewed in Jimi Hendrix, but with no live footage.
It complements the main feature quite nicely, and some good anecdotes
are forthcoming. It's presented in 4:3 and runs 63:01.
"The Making of Dolly Dagger" (6:31) uses the format familiar to
many "Classic Album" editions. Here engineer Eddie Kramer sits at a
mixing desk and takes us through this song from Rainbow Bridge,
breaking it down into its component parts: the basic
guitar/bass/drums/vocals, plus layers of guitar, fuzz bass, congas,
footstamps and backing vocals. Finally, "Stone Free Uncut" (6:06)
is a previously-unreleased performance from the 1970 Atlanta Pop
Festival. This is in 4:3 and has only 2.0 mono sound, but Hendrix fans
will certainly be glad to have it.
With Jimi Hendrix, Warners have revisited a film that was a
midnight-movie favourite in the 1970s and updated the DVD release with
some very worthwhile extras. Fans of the electric guitar, Sixties music
and Hendrix in particular should snap this up.
cherokeemist
2005-06-29 09:44:41 UTC
Permalink
but still not the famed Kathy etchingham interview
Mix
2005-06-29 14:25:53 UTC
Permalink
I bought my copy from "Wally World" just an hour ago (also known as
"Walmart" to everyone else in most parts of the US).

I love it. I've felt a profound sense of loss and sadness that he was here
in my lifetime and now gone, every time I've seen this film, but even more
so with this one. It's still running, in fact. The bonus footage. There's
a lot to see that I wish could have made its way into the original film.

The widescreen presentation reminds me of the day in 1973 when I ventured
down to W 42nd Street to see the film back in 1973 (it was the only theatre
in the city that ran the film). There may have been 50 people in the
audience on the day I went., if that. A lot of empty seats. It's not as
though it was a summer blockbuster. I remember seeing the footage from the
Marquee Club 1967 and singing along out loud with "Purple Haze" amid shouts
of "Go, Jimi!" or "Sing that damned thing!"

As for the film itself, which I've only scanned, since I already know it so
well -- there appears to have been some tinkering with the subject material
which I believe have added value, IMHO. I'm not talking about the sonic
enhancements, which are quite impressive. Rather, I'm inclined to believe
that EH has swapped better source footage from the original Joe Boyd film.
For instance, the Marquee Club footage starts out looking almost like a
Kodalith, and then suddenly the contrast evens out and the performance is
suddenly stereophonic. I know they didn't diddle with the Monterey footage.
It's the same as was on the previous _AFAJH_, except now in wonderful 16:9
aspect ratio. D. A. Pennebaker wisely retained the rights to his film. For
better resolution, different camera angles and a veritable feast for the
eyes, hearts and ears, you'll still need _The Complete Monterey Pop
Festival_ boxed set of DVDs for _Jimi Plays Monterey_. The downside is that
if you're a widescreen snob as I am, you're getting "pan and scan".

So much for familiar ground. The cutting room floor stuff is totally worth
the price of admission. We have the late Freddie Mae Gautier telling tales
of Johnny Allen's/James Marshall's early childhood neglect. We have the
late James "Al" Hendrix talking about his domestic problems and his
inability to provide for his children, his acknowledgement of Leon as his
younger son, the time he bought Jimi his first ukulele. Next, there's Billy
Cox -- excellent. Then there's more of Fayne Pridgeon. I was hoping for
some footage of her standing up. She looked great sitting down, but I
always felt there was more about her that I should know. There's more of
her story of her time with Jimi. Seems she wasn't a JHE fan. She's a great
story-teller.

Then there's some John Hammond, Jr. footage that wasn't even used in the
film. Then there's more Linda Keith. Then there's more Buddy Miles. Then
we learn that Eric Clapton didn't like the "Jimi Hendrix Experience"
concept. Then we hear Pete Townshend say it isn't sour grapes. More from
Mitch Mitchell. I think he got about 30 seconds in the original cut, and he
actually had a lot to say. Trust me: we will be discussing the new
interviews. I've not even seen it all yet. Sorry -- no new stuff fron
Little Richard or the Allen Twins or Mick Jagger, etc.

I don't want to spoil it, but there's plenty of information in the bonus
materials.
Post by cherokeemist
but still not the famed Kathy etchingham interview
axis in ladyland
2005-06-29 17:33:22 UTC
Permalink
Didn't get to look at it yet, I've decided to make a weekend of it...

---"...I always felt there was more about her that I should know..."---

ROTFLMAO!

My best friend & I were the only 2 in the area where I grew up who were
into Jimi back then. We were both quite smitten with Fayne P (as well
as Linda Keith), I think of what Tommy Chong said one time about how
much you can tell about a man by his wom(e)n. Ergo she sent JH's stock
soaring even higher, if that could be possible, in our views.

Then in '81 or '82 her article about her time with Jimi, including
photos of some of his letters to her et al, came out in some men's mag,
Gallery, maybe? Yes, she is a superlative storyteller.

You've got me drooling in anticipation of the new footage. But now I'm
talking about the non-Fay(n)e stuff, you understand...

Oh, last quick note re: EH's credibility---skimming a few old news
items in response to some of the other recent threads reminded &
stunned me, more than a bit, of how pervasive & insistent were Janie's
assertions, back in '95-'97-ish, that she was Jimi's 'half-sister.' I
mean I knew she was saying that, but I guess I hadn't realized how many
places & just how often or how blatantly she'd done that. And if she's
willing to take a tack like that, well...you know.

Of course she was called on it during the trial. Yet at that book
signing I attended (viewing the proceedings from a discreet distance)
last winter she was still calling herself Jimi Hendrix's 'sister.' I
guess that's the tactical concession she figured to take, to avoid the
appearance of outright falsehood while still preserving the illusory
impression necessary to accomplish her ultimate $trategic goal$...

More later on.
cherokeemist
2005-07-04 13:29:21 UTC
Permalink
sounds very groovy, cant wait to pick up my copy soon, still i find it odd
that the kathy etchingham interview is still left out.

peace.
Mix
2005-07-04 14:42:51 UTC
Permalink
Man, can someone please tell me about this Kathy Etchingham video? What
would it have said, if you know? As we know, there's no love between Janie
and Kathy. But she wasn't in the original _AFAJH_, IIRC.

But then, Buddy Miles is in the expanded interview footage (_From Ukelele to
Strat_), and he's suing EH.
Post by cherokeemist
sounds very groovy, cant wait to pick up my copy soon, still i find it odd
that the kathy etchingham interview is still left out.
peace.
axis in ladyland
2005-07-05 17:49:16 UTC
Permalink
This type of content, possibly?

http://www.thehendrixcollection.gobot.com/contact.html

http://members.tripod.com/~Wallyrus/rob.html

(excerpts)

We view Pim's videos of the SF jam and The Making of Electric Ladyland.
Kirsten is especially interested since she has not seen the ELL video.
Neither have I.
We all note that while Kathy is given credit in the film, her name is
misspelled (with a "C") and that her parts have been deleted.
Evidentally they conflict with the "official" view as told by EH and
Eddie Kramer...

...Post Script:

Since returning home, Kathy has related further details regarding
Janie, Al
and the events on Sept. 14. It seems that Janie DOES read Hey-Joe and
that
we have become her sworn enemies. Some of Al Hendrix's friends have
become
very concerned with his stamina and health. The continuous requests for
interviews and appearances exhausted him during his European trip and
his
"bodyguards" had concerns about his ability to stand during the plaque
presentation.

How sad it is that he has been reduced to "press bait" in order to
further
the aims of Experience Hendrix. Even his closest friends must now go
through EH to speak with him on the telephone.

To Janie Hendrix:

I know you're reading this.

Those of us who sincerely care about Jimi are appalled at the depths to
which you have sunk. Many of us celebrated the Hendrix family victory
at
Bumbershoot '95 and believed you when you said you would compensate the
other band members. Efforts to contact you in a friendly way have gone
un-
answered. Questions that we have about Jimi's music, compensation and
af-
fairs have been deflected or ignored. Your conduct and attempt to
disrupt
the Blue Plaque ceremony was another example of the crass, undignified
and
self serving attitude that disgusts those who knew and loved Jimi.

We will not sit idly by while you attempt to rewrite Jimi's history.
Know
full well that the members of Hey-Joe will be there, in your face,
whenever
you try to pull a stunt like this again. It is time for you to place
your
personal ego aside and free the music, the royalties and the spirit of
the man whose name you have taken.

Rob Hendrix

Sept 1997
jimmy
2005-07-06 09:19:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mix
Man, can someone please tell me about this Kathy Etchingham video? What
would it have said, if you know? As we know, there's no love between Janie
and Kathy. But she wasn't in the original _AFAJH_, IIRC.
But then, Buddy Miles is in the expanded interview footage (_From Ukelele to
Strat_), and he's suing EH.
Post by cherokeemist
sounds very groovy, cant wait to pick up my copy soon, still i find it odd
that the kathy etchingham interview is still left out.
peace.
Whoa! This is confusing. Unless my mind has finally gone round the
bend I recall that when I saw AFAJH ( the one whose logo is Jimi on the
tall stool w/ the 12-string, right?) I first saw it when it was making
the rounds in theatres (what? like late '73 or early '74? ) and
Kathy Etchingham was in it and in fact it was the first I'd ever heard
of her. She appeared a few times but seemed to be clips from the same
interview IIRC. I recall her clips as being some of the most intimate
in that she seemed to have some of the least personal agenda angles in
the film.

Now I have to dig to see if I have an old copy taped from TV back in the
80s. Weird.

Jimmy
Marshall Stack
2005-07-06 21:07:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimmy
Post by Mix
Man, can someone please tell me about this Kathy Etchingham video? What
would it have said, if you know? As we know, there's no love between Janie
and Kathy. But she wasn't in the original _AFAJH_, IIRC.
But then, Buddy Miles is in the expanded interview footage (_From Ukelele to
Strat_), and he's suing EH.
Post by cherokeemist
sounds very groovy, cant wait to pick up my copy soon, still i find it odd
that the kathy etchingham interview is still left out.
peace.
Whoa! This is confusing. Unless my mind has finally gone round the
bend I recall that when I saw AFAJH ( the one whose logo is Jimi on the
tall stool w/ the 12-string, right?) I first saw it when it was making
the rounds in theatres (what? like late '73 or early '74? ) and
Kathy Etchingham was in it and in fact it was the first I'd ever heard
of her. She appeared a few times but seemed to be clips from the same
interview IIRC. I recall her clips as being some of the most intimate
in that she seemed to have some of the least personal agenda angles in
the film.
Now I have to dig to see if I have an old copy taped from TV back in the
80s. Weird.
Well, if you do then don't expect to see Kathy there either. My first
exposure to the film was from "TV back in the 80s" and I also taped it and
watched it enough (before finally picking up an official copy in the
nineties) that I can say without hesitation that Kathy Etchingham did not
appear in it. Of course it's possible she may have been in the theatrical
release and edited out later but I doubt that.

Is it possible you're thinking of Linda Keith?
Mix
2005-07-07 15:16:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by cherokeemist
sounds very groovy, cant wait to pick up my copy soon, still i find it odd
that the kathy etchingham interview is still left out.
peace.
Is it possible you're thinking of Linda Keith?
There's no doubt. I was just responding to cherokeemist. I've never seen
Etchingham on any commercially available Hendrix video bit, and was
wondering myself where it might be, if it exists at all.

BTW, peace to my brothers and sisters in London and throughout England
today. Stand your ground.
Mad Dog
2005-07-07 20:48:03 UTC
Permalink
Mix says...
Post by Mix
Post by Marshall Stack
Is it possible you're thinking of Linda Keith?
There's no doubt. I was just responding to cherokeemist. I've never seen
Etchingham on any commercially available Hendrix video bit, and was
wondering myself where it might be, if it exists at all.
It does seem like I've seen maybe 15 seconds of Etchingham video talking about
the Danneman trial, but that would have been way after the time frame we're
talking about here. And didn't she get interviewed about the flat she shared
with Jimi when it was given historical status? I know I've seen her interviewed
on film but I can't place it in my addled memory. Maybe something I taped off
of VH1 - who knows...
Post by Mix
BTW, peace to my brothers and sisters in London and throughout England
today. Stand your ground.
Right on. Our hearts go out to you.
O***@aol.com
2005-07-07 21:40:40 UTC
Permalink
I just watched the vhs from the early released in the 80's..no
Etchingham.
Marshall Stack
2005-07-07 21:40:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mix
Post by cherokeemist
sounds very groovy, cant wait to pick up my copy soon, still i find it odd
that the kathy etchingham interview is still left out.
peace.
Is it possible you're thinking of Linda Keith?
There's no doubt. I was just responding to cherokeemist.
Yeah, and I was responding to Jimmy.
Mix
2005-07-16 03:36:39 UTC
Permalink
Guess I'm not receiving all of the posts to this thread on my server.
Jimmy's postings are "must-reads" IMHO.
Post by Marshall Stack
Post by Mix
Post by cherokeemist
sounds very groovy, cant wait to pick up my copy soon, still i find it odd
that the kathy etchingham interview is still left out.
peace.
Is it possible you're thinking of Linda Keith?
There's no doubt. I was just responding to cherokeemist.
Yeah, and I was responding to Jimmy.
Mad Dog
2005-07-16 22:31:45 UTC
Permalink
Mix says...
Post by Mix
Guess I'm not receiving all of the posts to this thread on my server.
Jimmy's postings are "must-reads" IMHO.
I only see one post by Jimmy to this thread. Are there more?
axis in ladyland
2005-07-16 22:56:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mad Dog
Mix says...
Post by Mix
Guess I'm not receiving all of the posts to this thread on my server.
Jimmy's postings are "must-reads" IMHO.
I only see one post by Jimmy to this thread. Are there more?
I too am confused as I also see only the one post from "Jimmy" to this
thread. Part of the problem may stem from the fact that he posts from
at least 5 or so different user names/email addresses, which has led at
least once in the past to my wrongly (I think?) thinking it was someone
else who used to post here...
Marshall Stack
2005-07-17 01:01:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by axis in ladyland
Post by Mad Dog
Mix says...
Post by Mix
Guess I'm not receiving all of the posts to this thread on my server.
Jimmy's postings are "must-reads" IMHO.
I only see one post by Jimmy to this thread. Are there more?
I too am confused as I also see only the one post from "Jimmy" to this
thread. Part of the problem may stem from the fact that he posts from
at least 5 or so different user names/email addresses, which has led at
least once in the past to my wrongly (I think?) thinking it was someone
else who used to post here...
There is just the one Jimmy post in that thread, but apparently it didn't
make it to Mix's server. He replied to my response to Jimmy's response to
Mix thinking it was a direct response to Mix. Since he knew what he'd
written, he probably didn't bother to read the section I quoted too closely
and thus missed Jimmy's comments in between Mix's and my own.

(Actually I probably should have just snipped Mix's and cherokeemist's
comments altogether and just quoted Jimmy since his post captured the
context of the thread pretty well by itself.)
Mix
2005-07-17 04:46:31 UTC
Permalink
Mad props to Stack, cherokeemist and Jimmy. Wow...y'all really read this
stuff, huh?
Post by Marshall Stack
Post by axis in ladyland
Post by Mad Dog
Mix says...
Post by Mix
Guess I'm not receiving all of the posts to this thread on my server.
Jimmy's postings are "must-reads" IMHO.
I only see one post by Jimmy to this thread. Are there more?
I too am confused as I also see only the one post from "Jimmy" to this
thread. Part of the problem may stem from the fact that he posts from
at least 5 or so different user names/email addresses, which has led at
least once in the past to my wrongly (I think?) thinking it was someone
else who used to post here...
There is just the one Jimmy post in that thread, but apparently it didn't
make it to Mix's server. He replied to my response to Jimmy's response to
Mix thinking it was a direct response to Mix. Since he knew what he'd
written, he probably didn't bother to read the section I quoted too
closely and thus missed Jimmy's comments in between Mix's and my own.
(Actually I probably should have just snipped Mix's and cherokeemist's
comments altogether and just quoted Jimmy since his post captured the
context of the thread pretty well by itself.)
enorbet
2005-07-18 05:57:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marshall Stack
Post by jimmy
Post by Mix
Man, can someone please tell me about this Kathy Etchingham video? What
would it have said, if you know? As we know, there's no love between Janie
and Kathy. But she wasn't in the original _AFAJH_, IIRC.
<snip)
Post by Marshall Stack
Post by jimmy
Post by Mix
Post by cherokeemist
that the kathy etchingham interview is still left out.
peace.
Whoa! This is confusing. Unless my mind has finally gone round the
bend I recall that when I saw AFAJH ( the one whose logo is Jimi on the
tall stool w/ the 12-string, right?) I first saw it when it was making
the rounds in theatres (what? like late '73 or early '74? ) and
Kathy Etchingham was in it and in fact it was the first I'd ever heard
of her. She appeared a few times but seemed to be clips from the same
interview IIRC. I recall her clips as being some of the most intimate
in that she seemed to have some of the least personal agenda angles in
the film.
Now I have to dig to see if I have an old copy taped from TV back in the
80s. Weird.
Well, if you do then don't expect to see Kathy there either. My first
exposure to the film was from "TV back in the 80s" and I also taped it and
watched it enough (before finally picking up an official copy in the
nineties) that I can say without hesitation that Kathy Etchingham did not
appear in it. Of course it's possible she may have been in the theatrical
release and edited out later but I doubt that.
Is it possible you're thinking of Linda Keith?
OK I have searched through boxes to try to find the old tape anyway just
so I could decide if perhaps I had confused the two but to no avail, no
tape. So all I could do was wrack my brain to try to figure this out. I
remembered that the main chicks interviewed in the movie were Fayne, Linda
Keith, the chick that was also in "Rainbow Bridge" that did the little
monologue about how people think that if they just had a few grand they
could get their thing together but really it takes more than that, etc
and, and damn! I couldn't really recall another important chick interview
but at the same time I cannot shake the feeling that I learned of her
existence through that film.

You see, up until recently I really wasn't much of a collector or typical fan
I suppose. I bought the first 4 albums as they came out, and a boot
called "Rainbow Bridge" that came out while he was alive IIRC.... heard
from another musician that "Cry of Love" was very disappointing, that it
didn't sound like the direction Jimi was truly headed in just before he
died, ie simple musician as opposed to showman, that it sounded like a
sales shuck and was possibly an affront to his memory and as that had hit
me quite hard I didn't buy it and several years later felt the same about
"Crash Landing" and "Midnight Landing". While I gobbled up any magazine
article I could find and anxiously awaited the book by Mitch Mitchell, it
took so long for that book to come out that to this day I have never read
a single book about Jimi. So you see it's not like I have a whole lot of
data to muddle, especially in those early years up to about '74.

So what can a poor boy do but to enter terms into Google, so I searched
various permutations to read what I could find online about Kathy
Etchingham. I am still haunted by this vision of seeing her name printed
out in yellow type below her interviewed face in that movie but I really
have to admit that nothing I read rang any bells with me. Certainly it is
Linda Keith who seemed to have the least personal agenda and who comes
across as sincere and level headed, so I am or was definitely confused on
that account. I really don't know how to correlate this out in any
definite way now without finding a copy of the original tape, but I am
going to stick my neck out and suppose that I was mistaken about Kathy
showing up in the original since everything I read of Kathy's own words
sounded like a completely new person to me, one of whom I had no prior
knowledge. I strongly suspect, Max, that the reason you thought and
offerred that I may have confused her with Linda Keith is because of my
description ringing that Linda bell, not a Kathy bell. Sorry for any
confusion, since apparenly it was all mine.
Jimmy
Mix
2005-07-18 06:11:19 UTC
Permalink
No harm done at all. You must post.
Post by enorbet
Post by Marshall Stack
Post by jimmy
Post by Mix
Man, can someone please tell me about this Kathy Etchingham video?
What
would it have said, if you know? As we know, there's no love between Janie
and Kathy. But she wasn't in the original _AFAJH_, IIRC.
<snip)
Post by Marshall Stack
Post by jimmy
Post by Mix
Post by cherokeemist
that the kathy etchingham interview is still left out.
peace.
Whoa! This is confusing. Unless my mind has finally gone round the
bend I recall that when I saw AFAJH ( the one whose logo is Jimi on the
tall stool w/ the 12-string, right?) I first saw it when it was making
the rounds in theatres (what? like late '73 or early '74? ) and
Kathy Etchingham was in it and in fact it was the first I'd ever heard
of her. She appeared a few times but seemed to be clips from the same
interview IIRC. I recall her clips as being some of the most intimate
in that she seemed to have some of the least personal agenda angles in
the film.
Now I have to dig to see if I have an old copy taped from TV back in the
80s. Weird.
Well, if you do then don't expect to see Kathy there either. My first
exposure to the film was from "TV back in the 80s" and I also taped it and
watched it enough (before finally picking up an official copy in the
nineties) that I can say without hesitation that Kathy Etchingham did not
appear in it. Of course it's possible she may have been in the theatrical
release and edited out later but I doubt that.
Is it possible you're thinking of Linda Keith?
OK I have searched through boxes to try to find the old tape anyway just
so I could decide if perhaps I had confused the two but to no avail, no
tape. So all I could do was wrack my brain to try to figure this out. I
remembered that the main chicks interviewed in the movie were Fayne, Linda
Keith, the chick that was also in "Rainbow Bridge" that did the little
monologue about how people think that if they just had a few grand they
could get their thing together but really it takes more than that, etc
and, and damn! I couldn't really recall another important chick interview
but at the same time I cannot shake the feeling that I learned of her
existence through that film.
You see, up until recently I really wasn't much of a collector or typical fan
I suppose. I bought the first 4 albums as they came out, and a boot
called "Rainbow Bridge" that came out while he was alive IIRC.... heard
from another musician that "Cry of Love" was very disappointing, that it
didn't sound like the direction Jimi was truly headed in just before he
died, ie simple musician as opposed to showman, that it sounded like a
sales shuck and was possibly an affront to his memory and as that had hit
me quite hard I didn't buy it and several years later felt the same about
"Crash Landing" and "Midnight Landing". While I gobbled up any magazine
article I could find and anxiously awaited the book by Mitch Mitchell, it
took so long for that book to come out that to this day I have never read
a single book about Jimi. So you see it's not like I have a whole lot of
data to muddle, especially in those early years up to about '74.
So what can a poor boy do but to enter terms into Google, so I searched
various permutations to read what I could find online about Kathy
Etchingham. I am still haunted by this vision of seeing her name printed
out in yellow type below her interviewed face in that movie but I really
have to admit that nothing I read rang any bells with me. Certainly it is
Linda Keith who seemed to have the least personal agenda and who comes
across as sincere and level headed, so I am or was definitely confused on
that account. I really don't know how to correlate this out in any
definite way now without finding a copy of the original tape, but I am
going to stick my neck out and suppose that I was mistaken about Kathy
showing up in the original since everything I read of Kathy's own words
sounded like a completely new person to me, one of whom I had no prior
knowledge. I strongly suspect, Max, that the reason you thought and
offerred that I may have confused her with Linda Keith is because of my
description ringing that Linda bell, not a Kathy bell. Sorry for any
confusion, since apparenly it was all mine.
Jimmy
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